Browse Prior Art Database

Running Application-Specific Servers in S/390 Logical-Partitions

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111647D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 93K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Marron, A: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed below is one of several techniques for using computer systems of IBM's S/390 family for information processing applications which require resources beyond the implementation limits of existing operating systems, such as MVS/ESA*, AIX/ESA* or VM/ESA*.

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Running Application-Specific Servers in S/390 Logical-Partitions

      Disclosed below is one of several techniques for using computer
systems of IBM's S/390 family for information processing applications
which require resources beyond the implementation limits of existing
operating systems, such as MVS/ESA*, AIX/ESA* or VM/ESA*.

      An example of such application is a multi-media application
which requires large amounts of memory for storage of video
information, and also requires different memory management techniques
than are readily available in MVS.  A S/390 computer system can
support more memory than a running MVS system can.  Special
capabilities for logical partitioning (called PR/SM*) allow multiple
operating systems to run concurrently on one S/390 system.

      One way to exceed the resource limitations in MVS is to run the
specific application in MVS, and use multiple instances of MVS to
utilize the full capabilities of the underlying machine.  A different
approach is described below.

      Create an Operating System (OS) kernel which is smaller and
simpler than common operating systems existing on S/390.  This kernel
can be developed by reusing portions of existing operating systems.
The new OS is simpler and more efficient than the general-purpose OS
which was used for its creation, and is geared directly to the needs
of the application.

      The application executes under this OS kernel in a separate
logical partition.  This instance of an OS provides an execution
environment only for the specific application.  In the case of
multi-media, this partition only reads from disk or other storage and
writes the information out to communication ports.  Extensive
buffering can occur in real memory, if the application so chooses:
e.g., a popular segment of a video can be always shown from memory.
Multiple such partitions can run concurrently.

      Since the software is application specific, value can be drawn
from sharing OS and application code, by sharing real memory between
logical partitions as described in [*].  These partitions can access
a database or special multi-media files in a read-only mode, or
receive their data using other techniques from neighboring
full-fledged operating systems.

      The multi-media operating system is functionally controlled by
another operating system, e.g., MVS/ESA, r...