Browse Prior Art Database

Batch Entry from Dialog Boxes (Secretarial Feature)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111649D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cahill, LM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Dialog boxes are the main data entry method for windowing based systems. They provide a simple "form" style entry panel that allows a user to enter data. Generally, an action is taken that presents the dialog, data is entered, and an action to accept the data is performed. The action that accepts the data generally closes or dismisses the dialog. This is acceptable if only one or two items need to be entered. In the case where multiple items need to be entered, this open..close..open..close process can be time consuming and frustrating.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 81% of the total text.

Batch Entry from Dialog Boxes (Secretarial Feature)

      Dialog boxes are the main data entry method for windowing based
systems.  They provide a simple "form" style entry panel that allows
a user to enter data.  Generally, an action is taken that presents
the dialog, data is entered, and an action to accept the data is
performed.  The action that accepts the data generally closes or
dismisses the dialog.  This is acceptable if only one or two items
need to be entered.  In the case where multiple items need to be
entered, this open..close..open..close process can be time consuming
and frustrating.

      A very simple solution is to provide a method to allow multiple
entries or batch processing from a single dialog.  In order to
accomplish this, two minor changes need to be made.  The first is in
the "close" buttons.  Most dialogs that allow entry have an Accept
(close is implied) and Cancel (close is also implied) button.  By
adding a new button to allow Accepting an entry without close,
multiple entries can take place.  The new button would be labeled
Accept/New, reflecting the fact that the current entry can be
accepted and then cleared for a new entry.  The old Accept button
would be modified to say Accept/Close to more properly reflect its
function.

      A simple example of usage would be calendar scheduling.  A
secretary may need to schedule 5 meetings.  They would schedule 4
using the accept/new and the last one using the accept/close.  T...