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Desktop Icon Monitor File Existence Disassociation Mechanism

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111694D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Williams, ML: AUTHOR

Abstract

Users and applications often create a multiplicity of desktop icons associated with files on non-volatile storage. For example, the properties of icons are often associated with EXE, BAT and CMD files. However, users periodically delete these files from non-volatile storage. Files are often copied to other disks or deleted, thus users advertently or inadvertently create orphan icons, i.e., icons for which no invocation file exists. Users usually do not recognize the orphan icon until they double-click the icon. This often inconveniences the users with reestablishing an association for the icon or manually deleting the icon from the desktop. More generally, these orphan icons often use valuable desktop real estate, i.e., occupy space that would better be used for actual invocation icons.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 73% of the total text.

Desktop Icon Monitor File Existence Disassociation Mechanism

      Users and applications often create a multiplicity of desktop
icons associated with files on non-volatile storage.  For example,
the properties of icons are often associated with EXE, BAT and CMD
files.  However, users periodically delete these files from
non-volatile storage.  Files are often copied to other disks or
deleted, thus users advertently or inadvertently create orphan icons,
i.e., icons for which no invocation file exists.  Users usually do
not recognize the orphan icon until they double-click the icon.  This
often inconveniences the users with reestablishing an association for
the icon or manually deleting the icon from the desktop.  More
generally, these orphan icons often use valuable desktop real estate,
i.e., occupy space that would better be used for actual invocation
icons.  A method is desired to eliminate or reduce the
above-mentioned problems.

      This article describes an Icon Monitor element that reads the
property list for an icon(s).  Upon determining the invocation file,
a Disk Search service scans the drive(s) for the associated
invocation file.  If the file is not found, the user is prompted with
the condition and permitted to reestablish an association.  (Note:
This mechanism can be invoked periodically or upon failure of an icon
to locate its invocation program.)

      A special Reassociator Service is invoked to allow automatic
changes in paths/direct...