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Adapting Mechanism/Process for Placing Large Chips/Dies with an M-Tool

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111697D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 83K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kelly, H: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a mechanism and associated process for placing very large dies (i.e., substrates) using a manual chip placement tool and a set of add-on tooling that is interchangeable with chip-placement setups, for minimum changeover time. It allows dies of sizes many times larger than chips to be positioned and placed into their mating cavities using the same traditional single vacuum probe used for the chips.

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Adapting Mechanism/Process for Placing Large Chips/Dies with an M-Tool

      Disclosed is a mechanism and associated process for placing
very large dies (i.e., substrates) using a manual chip placement tool
and a set of add-on tooling that is interchangeable with
chip-placement setups, for minimum changeover time.  It allows dies
of sizes many times larger than chips to be positioned and placed
into their mating cavities using the same traditional single vacuum
probe used for the chips.

      As can be seen in the Figure, there are two main pieces of
tooling:  a vacuum head adapter device which attaches to the existing
M-tool shaft, and a multi-purpose locator plate which mounts when
needed to the M-tool X-Y table's chuck plate that is normally moved
under the probe by the operator during alignment.  The vacuum head is
designed to fit quickly and easily onto the existing slender shaft
used to place chips.  It uses O-rings to seal the vacuum, but, more
importantly, to cushion the contacting surface on the die and evenly
distribute the forces, both of vacuum and placement.  The locator
plate was referred to as multi-purpose because its design enables it
to perform many functions that contribute to the overall
effectiveness, simplicity, and repeatability of the process.  There
is a swing in/away split-optics- prism/light/scope assembly on each
M-tool that allows the operator to see images above and below (of
chip and substrate) and perform alignment before placement.  However,
this technique would not work for the very large dies due to their
size and lack of marking/circuitry on the bottom side that the scope
would see.  Since it is important that the alignment of each die to
its cavity be good, and it would be difficult to use the vacuum head
tooling as a means of ensuring positional conformity due to the
delicate and thin...