Browse Prior Art Database

Time Base Broadcast Channel Secured Viewing Mechanism

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111743D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 82K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Williams, ML: AUTHOR

Abstract

Television adapter cards for the personal workstation are becoming increasingly popular. Such products allow users to view a variety of television programs using their personal workstation. These products, typically, allow a window viewing port where conventional television broadcasting can be selected, captured and otherwise manipulated as binary images. These systems typically provide capabilities whereby the user can resize the viewing port. However, these products typically confine their operations to incoming broadcast signals and ignore interoffice communications between users.

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Time Base Broadcast Channel Secured Viewing Mechanism

      Television adapter cards for the personal workstation are
becoming increasingly popular.  Such products allow users to view a
variety of television programs using their personal workstation.
These products, typically, allow a window viewing port where
conventional television broadcasting can be selected, captured and
otherwise manipulated as binary images.  These systems typically
provide capabilities whereby the user can resize the viewing port.
However, these products typically confine their operations to
incoming broadcast signals and ignore interoffice communications
between users.

      Often times users desire that particular programs/channels be
prohibited to specified users.  Related art, such as cable lock
boxes, provide locks for which all users are denied access.  More
recent cable boxes allow users to enter an access code for specified
channels.  However, both methods disable the entire box or the entire
channel for the period.  For example, some shows may be rated R while
other shows are rated PG13.  Thus, what is desired is the ability to
time lock the access methods.  In addition, the prior methods do not
address the identity of the user, i.e., the prior method assumes the
user who entered the access code is the owner.  Prior methods require
all parties to be at the designated workstation/monitor at the
specific time for denial/allowance of the program.  It is desirable
to provide a methodology whereby a meeting notice itself allows for
attendees (intended viewers) to automatically set their workstations
to a designated access viewing mode and program selection.

      This article describes a service which employs a
self-identifying broadcast viewing access notification identifier by
which a requester can distribute automatic broadcast programming
information.  This service allows originators, with specified
authority, to program remote workstations to deny/allow specified
broadcast program at the designated date/time.  The originator
specifies the date/time, channel, netw...