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Intuitive Category Presentations for Dialogs and Windows

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111753D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Henshaw, SF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In many graphical user environments, objects are presented to a user as single entities as well as groups of common sets. A clear and concise metaphor needs to be provided so that a user can pick a category, or any number of individual items from a list to form a specific filter for a query. The proposed metaphor centers around the idea of cards and ownership. It is proposed that each individual item be presented as a graphical card, and placed in a stack such that the title of the card identifying it is visible. Each group is then placed in a different stack, and each area card presents a miniature version of the associated cards. When a user selects an area, the area becomes marked, and the cards in the individual stack become selected as an indication.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Intuitive Category Presentations for Dialogs and Windows

      In many graphical user environments, objects are presented to a
user as single entities as well as groups of common sets.  A clear
and concise metaphor needs to be provided so that a user can pick a
category, or any number of individual items from a list to form a
specific filter for a query.  The proposed metaphor centers around
the idea of cards and ownership.  It is proposed that each individual
item be presented as a graphical card, and placed in a stack such
that the title of the card identifying it is visible.  Each group is
then placed in a different stack, and each area card presents a
miniature version of the associated cards.  When a user selects an
area, the area becomes marked, and the cards in the individual stack
become selected as an indication.  A user can then remove items from
that set (in which case the area card becomes unmarked) or can add
new items to that list of items.  The solution is quick to implement,
in that each of the individual items is defined as a segment.  This
is a graphical representation of that individual item.  Once a
segment has been created for each, then a segment is created for each
area, and is given a reference to each of the contained individual
elements.  This will automatically place a small version of each
element within the area's graphical segment, and selection will occur
automatically.