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Combining Multiple Layers of Configuration Models into a Single Report

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111755D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 4 page(s) / 93K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Allen, MO: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for combining multiple layers of configuration models into a single report. This method simplifies the processing that a manager application must perform and reduces the number of interactions required between manager and agent systems to collect information about the configuration of multiple communications layers.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Combining Multiple Layers of Configuration Models into a Single Report

      Disclosed is a method for combining multiple layers of
configuration models into a single report.  This method simplifies
the processing that a manager application must perform and reduces
the number of interactions required between manager and agent systems
to collect information about the configuration of multiple
communications layers.

      In a connection-oriented layered communication model, such as
SNA (Systems Network Architecture), each layer supports connections
to peer layers in other nodes, and these connections depend upon the
services of the next lower layer of the same node.  That layer, in
turn, supports connections to its peers in other nodes and has
dependencies upon the services of the next lower layer of the same
node.  For example, in Advanced Peer-to-Peer Networking (APPN*), the
path control layer has connections to other APPN nodes, called
transmission groups.  Each transmission group is dependent upon an
underlying connection at the data link control layer called a logical
link.  Each logical link is then dependent upon a resource at the
physical layer, called a port (or adapter).  See Fig. 1 for an
illustration of this concept.

      The connections at each layer may be modeled, using graph
theory, as a graph of vertices (a given layer entity being one vertex
and each of its peer layer entities in other nodes also being a
vertex) and arcs, with each connection between peer vertices
represented by an arc.  The dependency that each connection at a
given layer has upon a lower layer connection may be modeled by
identifying (with a unique name) the lower layer conn...