Browse Prior Art Database

Generic Objects

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111784D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 63K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Carroll, RW: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

An object is constructed in such a manner as to correctly participate with the network of peer objects at run-time, and yet not have specific programming in advance that would support the interaction based on any advance knowledge about the objects' contained data. This can be accomplished by finding the needed object interfaces and supplying logic that satisfies them by run-time determination.

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Generic Objects

      An object is constructed in such a manner as to correctly
participate with the network of peer objects at run-time, and yet not
have specific programming in advance that would support the
interaction based on any advance knowledge about the objects'
contained data.  This can be accomplished by finding the needed
object interfaces and supplying logic that satisfies them by run-time
determination.

      By carefully examining the desired usage of the "generic
object", you can arrive at a list of the necessary behaviors that
need to be present in the object.  This can be done by looking
closely at the anticipated collaborating objects, and enumerating the
behaviors they will require to successfully interact.  This list
describes the necessary external protocols for the object.

      Next, determine a method of satisfying these protocols from the
run-time available information the object is aware of.  This may
range, for instance, from being simply access or manipulation of
internal data, some algorithmic determination of the information, or
perhaps accessing the needed information via some external source.

      A specific example of this problem and solution can be found in
the usage of SQL database constructs (such as rows or tables) as full
participating objects in an object system.  SQL constructs would not
have the ability to behave in the manner envisioned by the object
system.  They could be made full participants, though, by the use of
an intermediate generic object that understands the required system
protocols and is able to satisfy them...