Browse Prior Art Database

Circular Data Buffers with Fast Bypass Path

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111806D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Klapproth, K: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a technique which utilizes multiple data buffers in a circular fashion with a fast bypass path which can be used when all of the buffers are empty. This method improves the overall system performance since the incoming data is stored locally in one of the buffers.

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Circular Data Buffers with Fast Bypass Path

      Disclosed is a technique which utilizes multiple data buffers
in a circular fashion with a fast bypass path which can be used when
all of the buffers are empty.  This method improves the overall
system performance since the incoming data is stored locally in one
of the buffers.

      The disclosed technique (Figure) consists of multiple identical
data buffers.  These buffers are variable in width, but each should
be capable of storing a complete data transfer from the incoming data
source.  The input data bus is connected in parallel to the inputs of
each of the data buffers.  The outputs of all of the data buffers are
multiplexed to form a single output bus to the receiver.  The
multiplexer can also directly select the input data, providing a fast
bypass path through the buffer logic.

      Normally, input data flows directly to the output data
utilizing the asynchronous bypass path.  On the next clock edge, the
input data is copied into the first available data buffer and may
also be sampled by the receiving data port.  If the receiving device
is unable to sample the data, then the multiplexing logic can select
the output of the appropriate data buffer to continuously provide the
data until the receiving device can accept it.  Meanwhile subsequent
input data is stored in the next available buffer.  The number of
buffers is chosen relative to the data transfer rate on the receiving
bus.

      The...