Browse Prior Art Database

Method of Correlating Calendar Entry Start and Stop Times to Logical Times of the Day

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111825D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, WJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Current art allows a user to create entries on the electronic calendar by specifying start and stop times, such as a meeting starting at 9:00 A.M. and ending at 1:00 P.M. However, many users need to specify particular time entities based upon logical times of the day, such as sunrise or sunset, instead of on clock times. The clock times are still relevant and indeed important, but the specification by the user should not be a painful experience of researching the time the sun will come up and then specifying that clock time to the calendar. The user needs to be able to input logical times to the calendar, and allow the calendar service to worry about converting these times into clock times.

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Method of Correlating Calendar Entry Start and Stop Times to Logical
Times of the Day

      Current art allows a user to create entries on the electronic
calendar by specifying start and stop times, such as a meeting
starting at 9:00 A.M.  and ending at 1:00 P.M.  However, many users
need to specify particular time entities based upon logical times of
the day, such as sunrise or sunset, instead of on clock times.  The
clock times are still relevant and indeed important, but the
specification by the user should not be a painful experience of
researching the time the sun will come up and then specifying that
clock time to the calendar.  The user needs to be able to input
logical times to the calendar, and allow the calendar service to
worry about converting these times into clock times.

      This system adds a useful service to the electronic calendar
which will accept logical start and stop times, locate the
appropriate conversion algorithm and/or data, and generate the
corresponding clock times.  For example, suppose an astronomer needs
to create a calendar entry for viewing the night skies with a
telescope.  When the astronomer creates the calendar entry, the
logical times are the only concern, in that the user must begin
setting up the equipment one hour before sunset in order to be ready
for viewing 30 minutes after sunset.  The user establishes a Logical
Time Profile (LTP) with entries such as:

SR = Sunrise, weather database query, units = hours (local)
SS = Sunset, weather database query, units = hours (local)
LN = Lunch, 11:45 - 12:30
which define applicable abbreviations to be understood by the
calendar application, as well as the definition of the term or the
means of attaining the required data.  Then the user simply creates
the desired calendar events as follows:

Date       Start     Duration     Event
   -----     -------...