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Using Shared OS/2 Presentation Manager Controls to Represent Multiple Host File Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111829D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 6 page(s) / 270K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Van Gennip, E: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

OS/2 Presentation Manager* (PM) allows a programmer to create dialogs which are used to receive input from a user. A single dialog could be developed which allows a user to specify file naming information for any type of file system. Most file systems have unique naming conventions, which often conflict with each other and cannot easily be used together. This single dialog allows the display, manipulation and selection of any filename, from any file system in a easy, seamless manner. This description explains how such a dialog is created.

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Using Shared OS/2 Presentation Manager Controls to Represent Multiple
Host File Systems

      OS/2 Presentation Manager* (PM) allows a programmer to create
dialogs which are used to receive input from a user.  A single dialog
could be developed which allows a user to specify file naming
information for any type of file system.  Most file systems have
unique naming conventions, which often conflict with each other and
cannot easily be used together.  This single dialog allows the
display, manipulation and selection of any filename, from any file
system in a easy, seamless manner.  This description explains how
such a dialog is created.

      The Figures and examples herein show file names representing
the DOS/FAT, OS/2 (FAT and HPFS), AS/400* (OS2/400*), S/370 (VM/CMS),
and S/370* (MVS/TSO) file naming conventions.  Although not shown
this dialog supports file names on attached LAN drives, and also
filenames on LAN's which are not directly attached by the use of the
UNC (Universal Naming Convention) name.  The dialog supports multiple
file systems and multiple connections to the same or different file
systems.  It also allows easy extensions to other system format such
as AIX* and UNIX**.

      Underlying function must exist which will query information on
each file system.  This function is not directly important to the
operation of the dialog and is not included here.

      What is unique is that the user is given one dialog in which
any filename from any of the above systems can be entered.  The user
can enter a filename by typing it from the keyboard into the
'selection entry field' in the dialog, or by repeatedly selecting
items from the 'Containers/Directories' listbox and finally selecting
from the 'Files' listbox.  The containers/directories listbox
presents a list of (servers, drives and directories on OS/2,
minidisks on VM, partitioned datasets and libraries/files on OS/400).
Each time a container is selected it is broken down into a list of
subcontainers, until no more subcontainers exist.  At this time a
filename is selected, The containers/directories listbox and files
listbox are shared by all file systems but presents lists of files in
the format of each file system.

      The type of file system is known by the 'server' the user
enters (or selects from the containers listbox).  Each server is
associated with a particular host and thus a particular file system.
After a users has selected a server we can present a list of files on
that server in the format corresponding to that hosts file system
naming convention.  Thus, the containers listbox may contain multiple
servers and under each is a list of containers displayed in the
format of the host file system.

      The above scheme allows the user one each interface to multiple
hosts file systems.  The user need not even fully understand the
underlying host file system.  This scheme allows new file systems to
be added fairly easily, mai...