Browse Prior Art Database

Defining and Selecting Objects Directly from a Background Image

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111836D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Feigel, RA: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for defining and selecting objects directly from a background image, thereby eliminating the need for foreground icons to define the location of the object. It is typical in today's computing environment to display graphical images or "icons" to represent objects that can be manipulated by the user. For example, the icon may be in the image of a personal computer. These icons are frequently displayed on top of another graphical background such as a geographical map of a floor plan.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 55% of the total text.

Defining and Selecting Objects Directly from a Background Image

      Disclosed is a method for defining and selecting objects
directly from a background image, thereby eliminating the need for
foreground icons to define the location of the object.  It is typical
in today's computing environment to display graphical images or
"icons" to represent objects that can be manipulated by the user.
For example, the icon may be in the image of a personal computer.
These icons are frequently displayed on top of another graphical
background such as a geographical map of a floor plan.

      Placing graphical icons on top of a graphical background serves
two purposes.  First, it provides the end user a way of selecting the
object.  But, more importantly, it allows system software to
differentiate between the background and the object.  Thus, when a
pointing device such as a mouse selects a position on the display,
the system can determine if the object or the background has been
selected and respond appropriately.

      In many cases, the objects are static in relation to the
background.  In other words, the position and number of objects does
not change in relation to the background.  An example is the back
panel of a personal computer.  The objects to be manipulated are
adapter slots and plugs.  One way to implement this graphically is to
create a background that represents a blank back panel.  Then
separate icons are created for slot and plug on the panel and p...