Browse Prior Art Database

System Recovery for Co-Requisite Files that are Updated during Product Installation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111842D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 63K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Edel, TR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The problem addressed by this article is the removal of software product (A) that shares file(s) with another software product (B) which was installed after software product (A). This creates inter-product co-requisite dependencies which are unknown to either product. If the shared file(s) are removed or modified when software product (A) is removed, then the subsequently installed software product (B) may not function properly. This condition is handled even though there is no ability in installation procedures to account for co-requisites. Software products need not expose these co-requisite dependencies. Consequently, the base operating system can be transparent to the relationships while still providing for software product removals.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

System Recovery for Co-Requisite Files that are Updated during Product
Installation

      The problem addressed by this article is the removal of
software product (A) that shares file(s) with another software
product (B) which was installed after software product (A).  This
creates inter-product co-requisite dependencies which are unknown to
either product.  If the shared file(s) are removed or modified when
software product (A) is removed, then the subsequently installed
software product (B) may not function properly.  This condition is
handled even though there is no ability in installation procedures to
account for co-requisites.  Software products need not expose these
co-requisite dependencies.  Consequently, the base operating system
can be transparent to the relationships while still providing for
software product removals.

      There are multiple reasons why it is necessary to remove a
product (software products in the context of this disclosure) after
it has been installed.  For example, incompatibilities with a prior
version, poor performance, unexpected runtime results, workstation
configuration changes, disk space management, etc., are all valid
reasons to remove an installed product from a user's workstation.
The installation of a given product may create new files, delete
unwanted files, and update existing files during the course of its
installation process.  Multiple products may share co-requisite
dependencies on other products that must be installed in order for
their product to properly function.  To effect a product's removal
from a workstation, even though the product never anticipated the
need for such a function, req...