Browse Prior Art Database

Programmable IC Chip Handler

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111844D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 4 page(s) / 93K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Edmundson, RJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A mechanism was required for use with an inspection workstation to pick up and transport devices under test (DUTs) to different locations within the workstation. A design was needed that could accommodate DUTs of different sizes and shapes arriving at the workstation in different types of carriers. The Programmable IC Chip Handler meets these requirements.

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Programmable IC Chip Handler

      A mechanism was required for use with an inspection workstation
to pick up and transport devices under test (DUTs) to different
locations within the workstation.  A design was needed that could
accommodate DUTs of different sizes and shapes arriving at the
workstation in different types of carriers.  The Programmable IC Chip
Handler meets these requirements.

      Disclosed is a mechanism used to move DUTs within a workstation
from  a carrier to a test station and other carriers.  The
Programmable IC Chip Carrier uses separate X and Y stages driven by
linear stepping motors to locate individual DUTs using offset values
from a reference position stored in a software lookup table specific
to each product tested.  Home reference points are set using
non-contacting, reflective fiber-optic sensors.

      Z-axis movement is provided by an air cylinder controlled by
spring-return solenoid valves.  Vacuum pick-up heads pick up and put
down DUTs for movement between carrier nests and the test station.
Use of dual heads reduces throughput time by permitting reloading of
the test station with an untested DUT immediately following unloading
of a tested one.  Vacuum to the head is controlled by two
double-solenoid 2-position detented valves which maintain vacuum to a
selected port even in the event of power interruption.  Vacuum
switches on each Z-head are used to sense the presence of parts.

      The handler assembly, shown in Figs. 1 and 2, consists of two
major subassemblies mounted to a common base plate.

      The Y-transport assembly 1 provides front-to-back motion.  A
weldment 2 mounted to the base 3 plate supports two slides: sensor
brackets 4 and a pneumatic shut pin 5.  The top slide 6 uses linear
recirculating bearings and the linear stepping motor 7 to drive the
carriage plate 8 through...