Browse Prior Art Database

Keyboard and Auxiliary Device Emulator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111855D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 80K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Badia, AR: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a device emulating a keyboard and/or an auxiliary device when attached to a computer system unit. The emulation device eliminates a need for human intervention during certain test sequences applied to the system unit, and may be further used to emulate the characteristics of a particular keyboard or auxiliary device to verify the operation of the keyboard or device with the system unit.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Keyboard and Auxiliary Device Emulator

      Disclosed is a device emulating a keyboard and/or an auxiliary
device when attached to a computer system unit.  The emulation device
eliminates a need for human intervention during certain test
sequences applied to the system unit, and may be further used to
emulate the characteristics of a particular keyboard or auxiliary
device to verify the operation of the keyboard or device with the
system unit.

      As shown in the Figure, an emulation device 10 is attached to a
computer system unit 12 by means of a keyboard cable 14, and an
auxiliary cable 16, which typically serves for the attachment of an
auxiliary device, such as a mouse.  As further shown, an actual
keyboard 18 and an actual auxiliary device 20 may also be connected
to computer system unit 12 through emulation device 10, which may
enable or disable actual keyboard 18.

      The emulation device 10 accepts command blocks through a
standard serial port, to which a serial cable 22 is connected.  This
cable 22 may connect emulation device 10 to the computer system unit
12, as shown, so that system unit 12 becomes the controlling system.
Alternately, cable 22 may connect device 10 to another computer
system (not shown) acting as a host system to become the controlling
system.

      Each command block transmitted over serial cable 22 has fields
describing its length, the type of command, and any data required to
allow the command to be executed.  Synchronization between the
controlling system and emulation device 10 is maintained through
command replies returned over serial cable 22, with device 10
responding to each command sent by the controlling software.
Asynchronous events, such as a push-button interrupt or an unexpected
parity error, are also indicated by device 10 through serial cable
22.

      With the basic command set, the user can instruct emulation
device 10 to send scan codes to system unit 12, controlling signal
timing and data throughput rate.  Emulation device 10 also co...