Browse Prior Art Database

Improvement of Page Navigation in CUA Notebooks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111888D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 71K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dawson, CA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The CUA-specified notebook control, popularized by its use in the OS/2* 2.0 workplace shell, is finding lots of use in graphical applications. The control organizes information well and provides for continuous and indexed access to information.

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Improvement of Page Navigation in CUA Notebooks

      The CUA-specified notebook control, popularized by its use in
the OS/2* 2.0 workplace shell, is finding lots of use in graphical
applications.  The control organizes information well and provides
for continuous and indexed access to information.

      Unfortunately, the control suffers from some usability
problems.  There are two techniques to navigate the control: using
tabs and using the scroll arrows on the lower right corner of each
page.  The former is visually prominent and the obvious choice.  The
latter is much smaller, is separate from the primary technique, but
is the only way to access additional pages under a single tab.

      The two navigation vehicles are disjointed.  Further, there is
no way to determine if a tab has more than one page associated with
it.  The programmer must display static text somewhere on the page,
typically near the lower right corner, saying it is "page x of y".
See Fig. 1 for a picture of a typical CUA notebook.

      This article explains how to place a graphic on each tab that
has more than one page associated with it.  This solves an immediate
problem: the programmer does not have to take up page space with
static text proclaiming there is more than one page and the user will
easily know there is more than one page as the graphic is a visual
cue.

      By making the graphic sensitive to mouse clicks, it can now
perform as both a visual cue and a nav...