Browse Prior Art Database

Pre/Post Processor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111903D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bell, W: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In an ideal world, computer networks would transfer data quickly and flawlessly throughout the world with no loss of data, and would operate independently of the system. A network administrator today is faced with rapidly changing standards and terse commands to transfer data from one site to another. They must deal with character set conversion, file system idiosyncrasies, and little endian/big endian problems between systems. A file on one system sometimes does not closely resemble the same file on another system. For example, they must understand that each line of an UNIX* ASCII file terminates with a line feed, while MSDOS systems terminate with carriage return-line feed. They must also remember that IBM VM and MVS file systems are not the same and many terse commands are set to convert to an MSDOS file.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Pre/Post Processor

      In an ideal world, computer networks would transfer data
quickly and flawlessly throughout the world with no loss of data, and
would operate independently of the system.  A network administrator
today is faced with rapidly changing standards and terse commands to
transfer data from one site to another.  They must deal with
character set conversion, file system idiosyncrasies, and little
endian/big endian problems between systems.  A file on one system
sometimes does not closely resemble the same file on another system.
For example, they must understand that each line of an UNIX* ASCII
file terminates with a line feed, while MSDOS systems terminate with
carriage return-line feed.  They must also remember that IBM VM and
MVS file systems are not the same and many terse commands are set to
convert to an MSDOS file.  The Pre/Post Processor tries to alleviate
these problems and will work in the future when the network changes
from FTP under TCP/IP to FTAM under GOSIP.

      The size of the transfer from one site to another is a concern
when the amount of data is in the gigabyte range.  The Pre/Post
Processor was developed with an expectation that file sizes will get
larger in the future much faster than our ability to maintain disk
space for this data.  The first issue is how long does a transfer in
the magnitude of 2GB take.  What happens if halfway through the
transfer the network goes down?  And can I read from tapes to save on
disk space?  The Pre/Post Processor provides a means to extract,
compress and decompress data from magnetic tapes or disk file into
smaller files.  These smaller files can then be transferred between
th...