Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Generating Sign Sample Temperatures in a Magnetic Resonance Probe

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111944D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kendrick, RD: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for heating a sample in a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiment using a radiofrequency (rf) field. The method improves upon known methods which have more complex designs and lower efficiency.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Method for Generating Sign Sample Temperatures in a Magnetic Resonance
Probe

      Disclosed is a method for heating a sample in a Nuclear
Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiment using a radiofrequency (rf)
field.  The method improves upon known methods which have more
complex designs and lower efficiency.

      One approach is to apply a Contiguous Wave (CW) or fated rf
power to an rf coil of appropriate geometry located outside of the
sample.  If the sample is dielectrically lossy, it will heat up by
itself.  This phenomenon is known to those skilled in the art.  If
the probe is used for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP), the sample
can easily be heated by embedding conducting material into it, such
as metal chips, then applying microwaves.

      A second approach is to heat a metal structure surrounding the
sample by coupling a CW rf field into this structure.  The structure
heats up as it absorbs the rf power, and in turn will heat the
sample.  The structure may be a thin film of any appropriate metal,
but must not interfere with the excitation/detection coil in the NMR
experiment.  Interference with the NMR sample coil is minimized by
positioning the rf heating coil orthogonal to the sample coil and
selecting a heating structure of appropriate geometry.

      For example, a saddle-shaped Helmholtz heating coil disposed
orthogonally to a solenoidal sample coil provides a suitable
configuration.  A sample is placed in a glass (pyrex or quartz) tub...