Browse Prior Art Database

Dynamic Language Switching in a Performance-Oriented Graphical User Interface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111951D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 88K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Malcolm, JW: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a technique that allows the user to switch the language that an application uses for its graphical interface both easily and efficiently without affecting the performance of that application.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Dynamic Language Switching in a Performance-Oriented Graphical User
Interface

      Disclosed is a technique that allows the user to switch the
language that an application uses for its graphical interface both
easily and efficiently without affecting the performance of that
application.

      In today's international market, support for national languages
has become increasingly important.  In many marketplaces, such as
Europe, there may be several people who use a single personal
computer.  These people may also have different native languages in
which they feel most comfortable.  Ideally, as each user sits down to
the machine, he or she should be easily able to switch the
applications on the machine to use the language of their choice.

      Performance of applications is always of paramount importance.
Many applications today use dynamic creation of text-based objects,
such as window menus, to more easily enable supporting different
languages.  The display of some of these objects requires very fast
response times, such as the appearance of a context menu following
the click of the mouse by the user.

      Since there is a performance penalty to create such objects
dynamically at runtime, the intelligent application creates them just
once and stores the results to disk in an initialization file.
Whenever they are needed after the initial creation, they are read
from the initialization file rather than recreated from scratch from
the source text files.

      This creates a problem when the application user wants to
switch the language files that provide the text used by the
application.  Since the application is now using data from the
initialization file rather than from the language source files, menus
created from the initialization file will not reflect the changed
language.  If the application always used the text files, the menus
would always reflect the current language.  An unacceptable
performance penalty to the user whenever a menu was requested would
result.

      With a language change by the user, the data currently residing
in the initialization file becomes invalid, since it is in what has
become the wrong language to the current user.  Since the data
previously written to the initialization file is used to maximize
performance after it is initially constructed and written out, there
needs to be a trigger to the...