Browse Prior Art Database

Robotic Component Removal Tool

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111952D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 6 page(s) / 126K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chrusch, P: AUTHOR [+7]

Abstract

A flexible workstation was required for automated removal of one or more user-specified electronic components from Multi-Layered Ceramic (MLC) substrates and cleanup of the sites from which the components were removed. In prior art, a workstation was used that could only work on one substrate at a time to remove a single component per operating cycle. The Robotic Component Removal Tool (RCRT) satisfied this requirement.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Robotic Component Removal Tool

      A flexible workstation was required for automated removal of
one or more user-specified electronic components from Multi-Layered
Ceramic (MLC) substrates and cleanup of the sites from which the
components were removed.  In prior art, a workstation was used that
could only work on one substrate at a time to remove a single
component per operating cycle.  The Robotic Component Removal Tool
(RCRT) satisfied this requirement.

      The RCRT disclosed here is a flexible, automated tool designed
to remove components from a ceramic substrate and prepare the sites
for installation of new components without disturbing adjacent ones.
Since a substrate is moved to separate workstations in the enclosure
for sequential operations, several substrates may be in process at
the same time, which realizes significant gains in throughput.

      As shown in Fig. 1, the RCRT is currently configured to remove
chips 1 and capacitors 2 mounted in a square grid pattern on the
surface of a substrate 3.

      As shown in the plan view of the tool in Fig. 2, the main
controls enclosure 4 at the rear of the tool contains main power
distribution, I/O and heater controls, and pneumatics.  The process
enclosure 5 is sealed to provide a clean, oxygen-free environment.  A
second enclosure 6 contains the robot controls, robot I/O, the x-y
stage controller, and the IBM PS/2* used as the tool controller and
user interface.

      Fig. 3 is a plan view of the tool with the enclosure removed,
and Fig. 4 is a front view showing the enclosure.

      In an operating cycle, the substrates are placed in specially
designed pallets (not shown), which can accommodate substrates up to
166mm square.  The substrate and pallet are placed in the input
station 7, which transfers it from the outside environment to the
process enclosure, where it is picked up by the robot 8 for transfer
between workstations.  The robot is equipped with a tool changer for
changing the end-of-arm tool (EOAT...