Browse Prior Art Database

Multiple Communications Protocols Waiting from One Program

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111959D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bullock, NC: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method which allows applications to support multiple communications protocols and which allows an end user to select the protocol for a particular communications session.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Multiple Communications Protocols Waiting from One Program

      Disclosed is a method which allows applications to support
multiple communications protocols and which allows an end user to
select the protocol for a particular communications session.

      In today's computing environment, many communications protocols
are available to applications.  An application that can understand a
variety of protocols allows more session control and more flexibility
to an end user.  This flexibility permits the selection of the
optimal configuration based on the benefits of performance versus the
availability of communications hardware and software.

      For two applications that reside on separate workstations to
communicate with each other, a communications session must be
established between them.  For single-protocol applications, the
availability of a communications session is totally dependent on the
"up time" of the link and the protocol software.  The provision of
multiple-protocol support helps to solve this problem.  For example,
if an APPC token-ring link becomes disabled between two workstations,
the exchange of data can be resumed by switching the session and the
protocol to an asynchronous variety.  In situations where
connectivity is controlled by a "waiting" application, the end user
on the waiting workstation can control the session protocol.  The
application soliciting the connection must obey the rules of the
protocol chosen by the waiting application.  To provide this support,
an application must provide a three-fold solution:

1.  Code to support each protocol.

2.  Dynamic means for loading and executing the selected protocol
    code.

3.  End-User Interface to allow the user to select a particular
    protocol or end the session.

      The Distributed Console Access Facility (DCAF), a product which
runs on OS/2* Presentation Manager* (PM) on PS/2* Personal Computers
(PCs), implemented this invention.  DCAF allows one PC, called the
controlling, to take control of the keyboard and mouse and view the
display of a...