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Source Level Debugger that Highlights the Number of Loop Repetitions

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111969D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Klein, LE: AUTHOR

Abstract

A method to keep track of the number of iterations of a DO loop while using a source-level debugger in instruction-step mode. A small window next to the start of each DO loop highlights the current number of repetitions.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 55% of the total text.

Source Level Debugger that Highlights the Number of Loop Repetitions

      A method to keep track of the number of iterations of a DO loop
while using a source-level debugger in instruction-step mode.  A
small window next to the start of each DO loop highlights the current
number of repetitions.

      Current source-level debuggers are able to highlight single
instructions such as the instructions where breakpoints are set, the
instruction where execution is currently stopped, etc.  It would be
nice if a debugger could also indicate the number of repetitions
through a repeating DO loop.  For simple iterative DO loops, a
programmer can display the loop control variable to determine this
information.  For a DO UNTIL or a DO WHILE loop, however, this
information can be more tedious to determine.

      Compiler-like intelligence could be added to a source-level
debugger so that the debugger would know whenever a DO loop were
being executed.  The debugger could be coded to keep track of when a
DO loop were being entered, repeated, and exited.  The debugger could
modify the display of the source code to provide an indication of the
number of iterations performed for the loop.  The simplest indication
would be a small window with a number in it.  The window would be
placed next to the DO loop to which it corresponds.

      The primary data structures needed to implement this feature
are the current high-level instruction register and the active DO
list. ...