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Briefcase Data Transfer System and Icon Interface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111973D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 92K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cahill Jr, RB: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Currently, when personal workstation users want to transfer work-in-progress (i.e., on-line documents they are reading, code they are writing, documents they are creating, notes, spreadsheet files, sticky reminders, etc.) home or to a different workstation they have to copy/move the needed data files to diskettes or transport them via a network (which in many cases is not available) to the target computers. This is currently all done manually and is prone to user error.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Briefcase Data Transfer System and Icon Interface

      Currently, when personal workstation users want to transfer
work-in-progress (i.e., on-line documents they are reading, code they
are writing, documents they are creating, notes, spreadsheet files,
sticky reminders, etc.) home or to a different workstation they have
to copy/move the needed data files to diskettes or transport them via
a network (which in many cases is not available) to the target
computers.  This is currently all done manually and is prone to user
error.

      This invention details a function that will automate the
process of moving unrelated work-in-progress data-files from computer
to computer.  By creating an icon that is a "briefcase", it will act
as a holding folder for the users data that he/she wants transferred.
The user can use either the briefcase command or, if available
through the use of a GUI operating system, drag-drop items directly
into the briefcase icon.  Each time that data is put into the
briefcase, the briefcase icon would swell as if it were being filled.
The size of the briefcase would be user-controlled.  The default size
of the briefcase would be equal to the available space of one blank
formatted diskette of the user's size preference (i.e., if the user
is using a PS/2 with a high density 3.5" diskette drive the default
size of the briefcase would be the blank available space of a
formatted 2.0 meg diskette).  The user could change the briefcase
size allocation, as this is only limited by the computers storage
resources.  When the briefcase is full (or within x% of being full)
the user is notified by a system generated message.  (x = user
controlled where 10 is the default)

      As an option in cases where a machine is shared, any user could
assign a combination (just like the combination lock on a physical
briefcase) to their briefcase, in order to keep the contents of the
briefcase private.  The briefcase could be tailored to accept a
password rather than a combination if it is preferred.  In either
case the briefcase security feature would be optional.

      Briefcases would be available in different colors to help
multiple users on a single workstation to differentiate between them.
If the user's source and target machines had a different storage
structure (like PATH), the briefcase function would learn this from
the user and use the conversion (until changed) for all briefcase
transfers.  A usage example: Jeff uses his comput...