Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Performing Automated Pseudo Video Recording of Remote Computer Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111990D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, WJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A desktop user often wishes to gain some information about the processing activity at a remote system in the recent past. For example, the user might like to know which video segment was being played at another machine earlier in the day. The system needs a method of verifying user and system actions on remote systems in order to aid in problem determination or necessary process changes. Furthermore, a desktop session should be able to be recorded and replayed on remote systems without forcing actual processing of programs on the computer system.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 69% of the total text.

Method for Performing Automated Pseudo Video Recording of Remote
Computer Systems

      A desktop user often wishes to gain some information about the
processing activity at a remote system in the recent past.  For
example, the user might like to know which video segment was being
played at another machine earlier in the day.  The system needs a
method of verifying user and system actions on remote systems in
order to aid in problem determination or necessary process changes.
Furthermore, a desktop session should be able to be recorded and
replayed on remote systems without forcing actual processing of
programs on the computer system.

      Prior art provides a method by which the user can verify the
exact user actions and system responses at any time during the last X
minutes, where X is the user-configured number of minutes of
interaction to be monitored.  This system provides a method of
performing such recording and playback on remote computer systems.
This is accomplished by automatic recording of the video RAM (Random
Access Memory), thus saving snapshots of the displayed video screens.
Whenever this system is activated, samples of the video RAM are
recorded at user-defined intervals and saved to digitized files.
Then, upon user request, the last X-minute portion of video can be
replayed by the user, thus visually showing the user actions and the
system responses for the last X minutes, so the user can verify
his/her interaction with the system.  The reco...