Browse Prior Art Database

Uniform Force Securing Device for Shake Testing of Hybrid Module Packages

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112003D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 4 page(s) / 111K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kelly, HL: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a means of securing flat pack-type semiconductor module packages during vibration, acceleration, or other types of shake testing. Using the hardware described herein, it is possible to effectively clamp any shape of component for attachment to tools that detect loose particles inside the component by shaking and sensing for outstanding oscillation patterns other than what is expected from the component itself. Obviously, it is crucial that any long leads or other I/O devices that hang from the main body of the component do not oscillate back and forth independently of the main body's motion. In other words, they must be clamped in place and move with the main body of the component in unison, in order to preclude the possibility of obtaining false particle detections.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Uniform Force Securing Device for Shake Testing of Hybrid Module
Packages

      Disclosed is a means of securing flat pack-type semiconductor
module packages during vibration, acceleration, or other types of
shake testing.  Using the hardware described herein, it is possible
to effectively clamp any shape of component for attachment to tools
that detect loose particles inside the component by shaking and
sensing for outstanding oscillation patterns other than what is
expected from the component itself.  Obviously, it is crucial that
any long leads or other I/O devices that hang from the main body of
the component do not oscillate back and forth independently of the
main body's motion.  In other words, they must be clamped in place
and move with the main body of the component in unison, in order to
preclude the possibility of obtaining false particle detections.  In
addition, the restraining device to be utilized must be able to be
attached to the part with no damage to the part's leads, it must have
uniform ramp-up of the squeezing force during application, and be
easy to use.  There is also a weight limitation imposed on these
devices for correct tool functioning.  Prior art is rare, but what
does exist is lacking in the areas mentioned.  The unique technique
described here addresses all of these factors, and is easily
adaptable to a wide range of product designs as well.

      The design can be seen in Figs. 1 and 2.  Fig. 1 shows a top
view and exploded plan view of the device assembly.  Basically, a
multiple cam-actuated lock-down ring 1 is used in conjunction with 4
grooved pins 2 to simultaneously apply clamping force in a uniformly
progressive manner over four evenly distributed points of the
component 3 outline.  This approach assures a correct and repeatable
clamping during each application, and requires only a simple
60-degree turn of the lock-down ring by the operator.  Usually,
cam-locking approaches are used with a single, centered cam.  This
design uses the four grooved pins 2 to engage the common lock-down
ring 1 in order to adapt to the geometric limitations of the layout
of the component 3.

      In Fig. 1, a component 3 with long leads 4 is loaded into a
custom-designed cavity that fits its shape in a base plate 5.  The
base plate 5 is attachable to the threaded mounting shaft 6 of the
tool.  The four grooved pins 2 are ...