Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Archiving User Activity of Interest on a Computer System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112006D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 68K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, WJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article allows specification of a predicate of various media content for the purpose of logging which computer user performed which action.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Method for Archiving User Activity of Interest on a Computer System

      This article allows specification of a predicate of various
media content for the purpose of logging which computer user
performed which action.

      It is often useful to know what activity has been performed on
a local or remote computer system.  In particular environments it may
be desirable to know what a user was examining while on a computer
system.  A method is needed for automatic logging to occur when a
user has navigated through, browsed or edited particular data.
Generally, a method may be needed for 'knowing' what a user is doing
on a computer system without an extensive desktop recording or real
time human and/or peripheral monitoring.

      A predicate may be specified of terms wherein terms are content
items which may appear visually or may be heard audibly.  Upon
detection of a predicate with such terms, the user (e.g. logon user
id) is logged with the predicate which caused the logging to occur.
Example predicates include:

          ('CONFIDENTIAL') AND ('IBM') AND ("*")

          ("CODE NAME") AND ("STAR WARS")

          (('SUBJECT ABC') OR ('SUBJECT XYZ')) XOR ('SUBJECT 123')
such that terms are delimited with single quotes or double quotes.
Single quoted terms delimit visual strings to search for and double
quoted strings are audible strings (i.e., speaker) to search for.
Operators such as AND, OR, XOR, NOT, etc. may be used to construct
complex predicates of visual or audible terms.  The occurrence of the
special asterisk character for audible tracking implies TRUE if
anything is played on the speaker.

      The predicates are internalized into a table which consists of
the list of conditions which must be true in order to execu...