Browse Prior Art Database

User Interface Design for Videoconferencing Entries

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112010D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 96K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fitzpatrick, GP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The potential merits of peer-to-peer videoconferencing have been extolled, while the technical feasibility of the technology has been maturing to the point of implementation capability. An architecture for elegantly presenting a feedback and interaction environment for such groupwork is needed to facilitate simple cognitive understanding and user-friendly presentation.

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User Interface Design for Videoconferencing Entries

      The potential merits of peer-to-peer videoconferencing have
been extolled, while the technical feasibility of the technology has
been maturing to the point of implementation capability.  An
architecture for elegantly presenting a feedback and interaction
environment for such groupwork is needed to facilitate simple
cognitive understanding and user-friendly presentation.

      Disclosed is a design for a graphical view of a
videoconference, with a rich assortment of functionality, including a
shared white-board space, and private side conversations.

      Proposed is a graphical representation of the participants in a
videoconference (Figure).  An individual window for each participant
exists within the videoconference container.  Each window may be
resized, moved, or overlapped with another window.  There is also one
or more windows which may be used by one or more participants
simultaneously to show slides, foils, videos, white-board
sketching/writing, etc.  These shared windows could be used to
support shared groupwork drawing and writing tools.  Users could drag
and drop data on a shared window, replacing the previous contents
with a composed view of that data object.  An individual
participant's window would usually show a video of that person at
whatever physical location they using.  This would necessitate a
video camera at that physical location, and a data dispersal network
(e.g., token ring) to send the video information to the other
participants.  When a given participant "has the floor", feedback
would be given by altering that participant's window in some way
(e.g., a colored border around the window, or a brightening of the
window contents, to provide immediate visual contrast).  The video
refresh rates may not be real-time, depending on limitations of
network and processor speed.  The user can obtain a pop-up context
menu on the background of the container window, allowing them to
arrange or tile the various meeting menus.  Pop-up menus could also
be obtained for the various contained windows, to resize or move the
windows, or initiate side conversations, as described below, or
obtain address book information on a given participant.  The video
and audio data exported from a participant's physical location would
be completely under their contr...