Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Query of Desktop Object with no Side-Effect Navigation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112025D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, WJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article allows a user to query arbitrary desktop objects without forcing a focus of the object, changing the z-order or performing any other navigational change. Often a user's desktop contains so many desktop objects, objects must be navigated in order to discover the sought object. For example, a desktop may contain many panels which overlay other panels. Currently, a user selects within a region of an overlaid object (i.e., panel) in order to know what the object is. Unfortunately, the object is focused which changes the z-order of the desktop objects and sometimes confuses the user as to what the other panels are which were previously in priority view or manipulated. A user needs a method for identifying overlaid desktop objects while preserving desktop object z-order.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 64% of the total text.

Method for Query of Desktop Object with no Side-Effect Navigation

      This article allows a user to query arbitrary desktop objects
without forcing a focus of the object, changing the z-order or
performing any other navigational change.  Often a user's desktop
contains so many desktop objects, objects must be navigated in order
to discover the sought object.  For example, a desktop may contain
many panels which overlay other panels.  Currently, a user selects
within a region of an overlaid object (i.e., panel) in order to know
what the object is.  Unfortunately, the object is focused which
changes the z-order of the desktop objects and sometimes confuses the
user as to what the other panels are which were previously in
priority view or manipulated.  A user needs a method for identifying
overlaid desktop objects while preserving desktop object z-order.

      This article describes a desktop object query which is a
read-only query to the desktop object.  The title bar text of the
selected object is identified to the user.  Two preferred embodiments
exist for identifying the title bar text to the user issuing the
query.  One embodiment surfaces a pop-up panel containing the text
string present on the object which was selected.  The pop-up stays on
the desktop until the user removes (e.g., ESC) it from the desktop.
An alternative embodiment annotates the title bar text string with
synthesized voice at some configured speed.

      Alternative embodiments...