Browse Prior Art Database

WYSIWYG Window-Sizing Management

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112045D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 4 page(s) / 184K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cahill, LM: AUTHOR

Abstract

One advantage of working in a multi-tasking windowed environment is that users can have multiple windows opened at once on their screen and work from these windows. But, screen size limits either the number of windows that can be visible at once, or the size for each window that is opened and visible. If users want to see two or three windows at a time, they must size the windows smaller so they all appear on the screen. But, when windows are resized, the content within the window always shifts so that only the upper left area of the window is visible (or the lower left, depending on the application default). If users want to keep the content within the middle of the window visible, they will have to make the window larger.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

WYSIWYG Window-Sizing Management

      One advantage of working in a multi-tasking windowed
environment is that users can have multiple windows opened at once on
their screen and work from these windows.  But, screen size limits
either the number of windows that can be visible at once, or the size
for each window that is opened and visible.  If users want to see two
or three windows at a time, they must size the windows smaller so
they all appear on the screen.  But, when windows are resized, the
content within the window always shifts so that only the upper left
area of the window is visible (or the lower left, depending on the
application default).  If users want to keep the content within the
middle of the window visible, they will have to make the window
larger.

      This problem is not as prevalent in windows that have scroll
bars.  When a window with a scroll bar is sized smaller, again the
content automatically shifts so the upper left (or lower left) area
of the window is visible.  But, users can then scroll to the
information within the window they want to see (this adds extra,
unnecessary steps for the user).  When windows without scroll bars
are sized smaller, the contents within that window get clipped to the
upper left corner and scrolling is not available.

      A technique is disclosed for a WYSIWYG approach to resizing
windows, allowing users to specify what content of the window appears
when it is sized smaller or larger.  First, the user will have to
select a Size to Specified Location option from a settings window.
This will set the WYSIWYG resizing mode for the application.  Then,
as the user resizes the window vertically and horizontally, the
content within the window does NOT shift to the upper or lower left
by default.  Instead, the content to which the user resizes to is
visible within the smaller window.

      Non-scrollable Window Example: A user likes...