Browse Prior Art Database

Correlation of Multiple Communications Stacks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112152D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Allen, MO: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method that makes it possible for network managers to associate the locations of multiple communications subsystems that are installed in the same computing system.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Correlation of Multiple Communications Stacks

      Disclosed is a method that makes it possible for network
managers to associate the locations of multiple communications
subsystems that are installed in the same computing system.

      A computing system may have multiple communications stacks
installed and active at the same time.  For example, a desktop
computer may be running TCP/IP and APPN* concurrently.  Each of these
communications subsystems (also referred to as a communications
"stack") has its own identity, or node name, by which it is known in
the appropriate network.  In order to better manage all of the
networked resources in an enterprise, information about both logical
networks may be reported to a single network management system.
There is no obvious way for a management application program to
recognize that two apparently unrelated systems in the different
networks are actually residing on the same computing system.
However, this recognition would frequently be an aid for management.
For example, if a manager receives an error event report from stack A
and an error event report from stack B, the manager's diagnosis is
aided by the knowledge that stacks A and B are implemented on the
same processor.  If multiple stacks on the same processor experience
similar problems, the manager may first suspect problems with shared
supporting layers, such as data link or physical layers.

      The ISO/CCITT standards do not specify how to correlate
mu...