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Browse Prior Art Database

Disk Quota Management Priviliges

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112208D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hunt, GT: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

As Local Area Networks (LANs) grow in size, and as corporations downsize from mainframes, disk space on server machines is increasingly becoming a prized commodity. Consequently, LAN administrators want greater control overthe way the disk space is used; not only do they want to control disk access but also disk space utilization. For example, an administrator may want to grant userid JOE read/write access to a particular directory tree but wants to ensure that the size of this directory tree does not exceed 35MB of disk space. This feature is called DASD Limits.

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Disk Quota Management Priviliges

      As Local Area Networks (LANs) grow in size, and as corporations
downsize from mainframes, disk space on server machines is
increasingly becoming a prized commodity.  Consequently, LAN
administrators want greater control overthe way the disk space is
used; not only do they want to control disk access but also disk
space utilization.  For example, an administrator may want to grant
userid JOE read/write access to a particular directory tree but wants
to ensure that the size of this directory tree does not exceed 35MB
of disk space.  This feature is called DASD Limits.

      In certain Network Operating Systems (NOS), normal users -
those that have no administrative privileges - can operate in an
administrative capacity relative to a particular directory tree if
they have full access rights to that directory.  These users can
create/revise/delete files, create/remove directories and control the
kind of access other normal users have to this particular directory.

      The inherent disadvantage is that an administrator will setup a
directory, with a disk quota, for a userid and give the userid full
access rights to that directory.  Consequently, the userid can manage
access to the directory but not the disk space alloted to it by the
administrator.  The administrator is the only one who can manage disk
quotas - even for directories that can be administered by normal
users.  For example, a userid GREG has been alloted 5...