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Diagramming Execution Density of a Computer Program

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112211D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 66K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Evans, DH: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This method is a process for diagraming the execution of a computer program that provides a posteriori insights into program execution that are either not possible or cumbersome with other methods.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 73% of the total text.

Diagramming Execution Density of a Computer Program

       Figure.  Execution Density - pmlines.trc.

      This method is a process for diagraming the execution of a
computer program that provides a posteriori insights into program
execution that are either not possible or cumbersome with other
methods.

      The diagram is referred to as an Execution Density diagram
because the density (shading) of the diagram varies directly with the
amount of execution time consumed by the program unit at the
corresponding point of execution.

      An Execution Density diagram is a two-dimensional
representation of a program's execution, and it is constructed as
follows:

1.  Divide the total execution time of a program into N discrete and
    equal slices of time.  Each such slice represents 1/Nth of the
    total execution time of the program and comprises a single row of
    the diagram.

2.  Divide the total program code into M discrete and named
    partitions.  Each partition may contain a different amount of
    code and should correspond to some identifiable part of the total
    program.  For example, each partition might represent:

    a.  A single procedure in the procedural program.

    b.  A single class in an object-oriented program.

    c.  A single module in a program with modules.

    d.  A single library or executable file in a program built from
        these components.

    Each column of the diagram...