Browse Prior Art Database

Adapter for Attaching an 8-Bit SCSI Device to a 16-Bit SCSI Cable

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112214D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 4 page(s) / 145K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Anderson, ME: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is an adapter for allowing the attachment of an 8-bit SCSI device having a standard 50-pin connector to a standard 68-pin connector of a 16-bit internal SCSI cable, together with an architecture in which both 8-bit and 16-bit SCSI devices are attached to a single ribbon cable configured for the attachment of 16-bit devices.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

Adapter for Attaching an 8-Bit SCSI Device to a 16-Bit SCSI Cable

      Disclosed is an adapter for allowing the attachment of an 8-bit
SCSI device having a standard 50-pin connector to a standard 68-pin
connector of a 16-bit internal SCSI cable, together with an
architecture in which both 8-bit and 16-bit SCSI devices are attached
to a single ribbon cable configured for the attachment of 16-bit
devices.

      Fig.  1 is a partially exploded view of the connection of an
8-bit SCSI device to a 16-bit internal SCSI cable, by means of a
first version of the adapter.  A standard 16-bit internal SCSI cable
10 includes a number of cable connectors 12 for the attachment of
various devices.  Each connector 12 is a D-shell type having 68
individual contact pins 14, in two rows on 0.050-inch centers.  A
standard 16-bit SCSI device (not shown) includes a connector 18
mating with a connector 20 having fifty individual contact pins 21 in
two rows on 0.100-inch centers.

      To facilitate the connection of device 16 to cable 10, this
mating connector 20 is attached, together with a connector 22 mating
with cable connector 12, to a circuit card 24, forming an adapter 26.
Connector 22 includes a number of soldertails 28, individually
connected to a number of sockets (not shown), which in turn mate with
individual pins 14 when the adapter 26 is plugged into cable
connector 12.  Soldertails 28 extend through plated-through holes 30
in circuit card 24, being individually soldered in place.  Similarly,
a soldertail (not shown) extends from each pin 21 in connector 20
through an adjacent plated-through hole 32 in circuit card 24, being
soldered in place.  Appropriate electrical connections are made on
circuit card 24 between various holes 30 and 32.

      Figs. 2 through 4 are end elevational views of alternate
methods for forming an adapter for use as described above.  In a
first alternative adapter 34, shown in Fig. 2, the solder attachment
of soldertails extending through plated-through holes is replaced by
the use of a surface mount technology, in which individual tabs 36
are soldered to associated individual conductive pads extending along
the edges of each side of an alternate circuit card 38.  Connectors
40 and 42 are otherwise similar to connectors 20 and 22,
respectively, of adapter 26.  The use of surface mount technology
allows the connectors 40 and 42 to be placed directly opposite each
other on opposite sides of circuit card 38, while in adapter 26
connectors 20 and 22 are staggered to permit access to the
soldertails for solder attachment on each side of circuit card 24.

      In a second alternative, adapter 44, shown in Fig. 3,
right-angle connectors 46 and 48 are attached to a circuit card 50
extending in a plane parallel to connection pins 52, while the
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