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Browse Prior Art Database

Fabrication of Metallic Nanopatterns and Circuits

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112223D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kowalczyk, SA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a process for fabrication of metallic patterns and circuits on a nanometer scale. Such processes will be needed in the future as the dimensions of semiconductor integrated circuits become progressively smaller and approach a size scale of nanometers.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Fabrication of Metallic Nanopatterns and Circuits

      Disclosed is a process for fabrication of metallic patterns and
circuits on a nanometer scale.  Such processes will be needed in the
future as the dimensions of semiconductor integrated circuits become
progressively smaller and approach a size scale of nanometers.

      This invention is a two step process.  Both steps are carried
out in ultrahigh vacuum.  In the first step the pattern is defined by
creating a catalytically active surface on a nanometer or
subnanometer size scale.  This pattern might consist of reactive
metal atoms outlining a desired circuit.  The second step is the
growth of metal films of desired thickness on the defined pattern and
is performed by selective area chemical vapor deposition.

      The first step of this process, requiring generation of an
active substrate surface on a nanometer or subnanomter scale, can be
implemented in any of the following ways:  1) metal atoms can be
deposited onto an insulating surface from a gold tip of a scanning
tunneling microscope; 2) a scanning tunneling microscope can be used
to etch away a thin oxide from oxide coated silicon or oxide coated
metal to expose clean silicon or metal in the desired pattern; 3) a
thin oxide or polymer overcoat (such as polyimide) can be scratched
away with the tip of an atomic force microscope to expose fresh
silicon or metal in the desired pattern; or 4) the pattern can be
formed by removing the thin oxide or polymer overcoat by micromilling
with either a rastered ion beam or a micromachining tool t...