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Browse Prior Art Database

System Emulation Board for Hardware Verification

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112240D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brooks, JS: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes a design of a verification board intended to verify that an OEM (original equipment manufacturer) microprocessor will function correctly in any system which a customer may design for the processor.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

System Emulation Board for Hardware Verification

      This article describes a design of a verification board
intended to verify that an OEM (original equipment manufacturer)
microprocessor will function correctly in any system which a customer
may design for the processor.

      Although a processor design, prior to its manufacture, may be
simulated in software with "behaviorals" that mimic system behavior,
many functional defects may not be found until the integration of the
manufactured part with a real system, resulting in expensive
iterations of the manufactured design and delays in the product
availability.  What is needed is a "generic" system board which can
emulate most of the system environments that are allowed by the
processor's specification.  Running early samples of the processor
hardware on this board can expose the processor to system
environments much sooner than it might encounter them in customer
systems.

The verification board design achieves this flexibility in four ways:

1.  The clock network consists of two stages of phase-locked
    loop-based clock generators and doublers, which are socketed and
    can be configured to provide a system bus frequency equal to the
    processor frequency, or equal to one-half the processor
    frequency--by far the two most common modes of system bus
    operation.

2.  Three processors can be installed in the board.  The processors
    share a common system bus, allowing two processors to provide
    many of the multi-processor bus situations which could be
    "observed" by a t...