Browse Prior Art Database

Action Chains for Object Oriented Graphical User Interfaces

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112257D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, VM: AUTHOR

Abstract

Described is the operation of an interface which allows a user to specify and repeatedly execute a sequence of actions without having to repeatedly select the same options from the menus. The approach allows a user to rapidly perform a series of actions on a set of objects.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Action Chains for Object Oriented Graphical User Interfaces

      Described is the operation of an interface which allows a user
to specify and repeatedly execute a sequence of actions without
having to repeatedly select the same options from the menus.  The
approach allows a user to rapidly perform a series of actions on a
set of objects.

      When using an application with a Graphical User Interface
(GUI), it is at times necessary to perform the same sequence of
actions on different objects.  Today this is implemented in
applications by having the user repeatedly make the same sequence of
menu selections for each of the objects.  This is very tedious and
time consuming.

      Discussions with users of other OO applications indicate a
similar problem.  The OO design seems to result in structures that
require several steps to complete an operation.

      One example where the problem was found was in building a data
model chart.  Each line in the chart needs to have an arrowhead added
to it to indicate the flow direction of the corresponding
relationship name.  In the application I was working with, this was
required for each line:

1.  use the mouse and button to pick the 'current' object

2.  pick the format option

3.  pick the line option (from the resulting pop-up menu)

4.  pick the arrowhead direction option (from the resulting pop-up
    menu)

Since a data model can have many lines this a very laborious process.
In the following Figures, the same sequence of menu selections is
required for each line, with the exception of the last menu to pick
the arrow direction.

This is illustrated...