Browse Prior Art Database

Configuring DOS NetBIOS and DOS 802.2 Applications to Run Under OS/2 2.0

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112261D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 72K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bartek, BA: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A method is described to enable DOS Transport (NetBIOS and 802.2) applications running in OS/2 2.0 Virtual DOS Machines, VDMs, access to OS/2* Transport (NetBIOS and 802.2) resources. This is necessary because, in OS/2 2.0 VDMs, DOS NetBIOS and DOS 802.2 applications actually use OS/2 NetBIOS and OS/2 802.2 resources respectively.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Configuring DOS NetBIOS and DOS 802.2 Applications to Run Under OS/2
2.0

      A method is described to enable DOS Transport (NetBIOS and
802.2) applications running in OS/2 2.0 Virtual DOS Machines, VDMs,
access to OS/2* Transport (NetBIOS and 802.2) resources.  This is
necessary because, in OS/2 2.0 VDMs, DOS NetBIOS and DOS 802.2
applications actually use OS/2 NetBIOS and OS/2 802.2 resources
respectively.

In OS/2 2.0, there is a concept of Virtual DOS Machines, VDMs, which
allow DOS applications to run within OS/2 2.0.  A virtual device
driver, VDD, is coded to control an OS/2 2.0 Virtual DOS interrupt
and translate DOS API requests to OS/2 API requests thus allowing DOS
applications to run without modifications within OS/2 2.0 VDMs.  The
DOS NetBIOS and IEEE 802.2 interrupt that is taken over is Interrupt
5C.  Since the DOS Transport applications indirectly use the OS/2
Transport services and resources, they need a mechanism by which to
access the OS/2 Transport resources.  In this example, DOS NetBIOS
applications need OS/2 NetBIOS sessions, commands, and names and DOS
802.2 applications need OS/2 802.2 direct station access in order to
run under OS/2 2.0.  Other VDDs that are part of OS/2 2.0 aquire
their respective resources by including a keyword in the 'DOS

Settings' that is part of each DOS Full Screen and DOS Window
environment.

      The method of using 'DOS Settings' is not preferred because
there is no Application Program Interface to the 'DOS Settings' in
OS/2 2.0 VDMs; no new config parameters can be added to the 'DOS
Settings' programmatically.  There are two distinct advantages to
having the configuration triggered by a DOS program.  First, a method
to obtain resources by running a DOS utility program without having
to open the 'DOS Settings' is desirable.  Second, running a DOS
confi...