Browse Prior Art Database

Architecture for Automatic Window Persistence

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112267D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Morgan, SA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

End-user customization of an applications user interface is a desirable feature for a program. Once the end-user does the customization, the changes should persist the next time the application is executed. Within the windowing realm, things such as window size, window position, window state (Minimized or Maximized) should be retained to help provide a comfortable feeling to the user who last executed the program.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 59% of the total text.

Architecture for Automatic Window Persistence

      End-user customization of an applications user interface is a
desirable feature for a program.  Once the end-user does the
customization, the changes should persist the next time the
application is executed.  Within the windowing realm, things such as
window size, window position, window state (Minimized or Maximized)
should be retained to help provide a comfortable feeling to the user
who last executed the program.

      OS/2* 2.X Presentation Manager programmers can use the
WinSaveWindowPos and WinRestoreWindowPos APIs which write to disk the
characteristics about the window.  These APIs store and set the
window size, window position and other window characteristics.

      Unfortunately, these APIs only work on existing windows and
therefore the information must be saved before the frame is
destroyed.  These APIs read and write to a disk file which can
significantly help delay the user event that caused the need for the
information to be saved.

      Instead of writing the data to disk when a panel closes, an
architecture should be created to manage this need efficiently.

      When the frame is to be destroyed the information should be
saved off in memory.  If the frame information is subsequently
needed, the memory can be referenced therefore it does not need any
disk access.

      When a particular frame is to be shown for the first time the
data can be read from disk or all the data...