Browse Prior Art Database

Flow Control for a Multimedia Distributed Client Server

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112297D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Aho, ME: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a method to avoid flooding and overwhelming a requesting system with responses from many responding systems which received the same request as a broadcast. When a frame is broadcast to many systems across a Local Area Network (LAN), responding systems pick a random time within a specified time period to send a response to avoid flooding and overwhelming the source system with responses. The requesting system may state the time period limit and/or the probability distribution for the random time in the request to the responding system.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 91% of the total text.

Flow Control for a Multimedia Distributed Client Server

      Disclosed is a method to avoid flooding and overwhelming a
requesting system with responses from many responding systems which
received the same request as a broadcast.  When a frame is broadcast
to many systems across a Local Area Network (LAN), responding systems
pick a random time within a specified time period to send a response
to avoid flooding and overwhelming the source system with responses.
The requesting system may state the time period limit and/or the
probability distribution for the random time in the request to the
responding system.

      In a typical, robust embodiment, the requesting system
originates a request frame on a LAN as a broadcast to many
destination systems in the network.  The broadcast, for example,
could be a multicast address, functional address, group address, or
broadcast address for LAN adapters participating in the broadcast
address.  Another possibility is an IP broadcast or IP multicast.

      Within the request frame, the requesting system may specify the
probability distribution for each responding system to use in
generating a time to send its response.  For example, the request
frame could specify a uniform distribution from 0 to 10 seconds by
encoding these as field values.  The receiving systems must commonly
understand how to interpret the field values in their part of the
implementation.

      If a receiving system is part of the responding gr...