Browse Prior Art Database

Method of Managing Storage of Merchandise Involving Innerpacks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112339D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gregory Jr, WD: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Within retail distribution, there exists a phenomenon that cases of merchandise contain both "eaches" packs of product and "inner-packs" of product. For example, a case of flashlight batteries may contain 144 packages of batteries which is considered to be a unit. Further, the case may have light-duty boxes or poly-wrapped groupings of 12 battery units. These are called inner-packs. In practice in a Distribution Center (DC), there may be designated ship units, which are the minimum quantity of a given Stock-Keeping Unit (SKU) that a DC would ship out at any point in time. Prior to the 1990's, high moving, small product would have the ship unit be the case level. The trend is to replenish only what the stores are selling, therefore the ship units are moving to the inner-pack level and even to the unit level.

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Method of Managing Storage of Merchandise Involving Innerpacks

      Within retail distribution, there exists a phenomenon that
cases of merchandise contain both "eaches" packs of product and
"inner-packs" of product.  For example, a case of flashlight
batteries may contain 144 packages of batteries which is considered
to be a unit.  Further, the case may have light-duty boxes or
poly-wrapped groupings of 12 battery units.  These are called
inner-packs.  In practice in a Distribution Center (DC), there may be
designated ship units, which are the minimum quantity of a given
Stock-Keeping Unit (SKU) that a DC would ship out at any point in
time.  Prior to the 1990's, high moving, small product would have the
ship unit be the case level.  The trend is to replenish only what the
stores are selling, therefore the ship units are moving to the
inner-pack level and even to the unit level.

      The problem addressed herewith concerns the depletion of units
or inner-packs within a case.  When cases are broken down (called
break-pack), the cube volume occupied by the product decreases, but
the storage capacity of replenishment cases does not change until the
case is emptied and discarded.

      This solution to the problem consists of three table values in
an item (SKU) master file which depict the contents of the case.
These five values are

1.  Case Qty

2.  Inner-pack Qty

3.  Minimum ship unit

4.  Number of inner-packs in a case (Case qty divided by inner-pack
    quantity)

5.  Number of ship units in an inner-pack (Inner-pack quantity
    divided by the ship-unit)

      Accessing table values makes...