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Uncluttered Object Oriented End User Interface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112358D
Original Publication Date: 1994-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 4 page(s) / 232K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brown, DS: AUTHOR [+7]

Abstract

An object oriented Graphical User Interface (GUI) design is disclosed which allows users to begin to learn the operation of an application through an uncluttered set of windows, which are positioned and sized for clear and simple navigation. The interface encourages the use of a pointing device (i.e., a mouse) to navigate through the various windows of the application as a first step towards full use of object oriented interfaces. As the user becomes more familiar with the GUI, he can explore the use of the pointing device for moving and sizing the windows. Finally, he can fully utilize the underlying object oriented interface via the mastering of "drag" and "drop" techniques.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 44% of the total text.

Uncluttered Object Oriented End User Interface

       An object oriented Graphical User Interface (GUI) design is
disclosed which allows users to begin to learn the operation of an
application through an uncluttered set of windows, which are
positioned
and sized for clear and simple navigation. The interface encourages
the
use of a pointing device (i.e., a mouse) to navigate through the
various
windows of the application as a first step towards full use of object
oriented interfaces. As the user becomes more familiar with the GUI,
he can explore the use of the pointing device for moving and
sizing the windows.  Finally, he can fully utilize the underlying
object
oriented interface via the mastering of "drag" and "drop" techniques.

       The basis of the object oriented GUI design is the IBM
Common User Access* Guidelines (CUA '91). The typical application
designed using these guidelines has several windows representing
different objects open at the same time and arranged randomly
on the screen (sometimes referred to as a "messy desktop"). This kind
of interface is highly productive for the user who is proficient at
at using a windowed interface and a pointing device. The interface
has been modified in this design to accommodate new users, while
maintaining the underlying object oriented concepts for use by
the skilled user. The scheme for displaying, sizing, and positioning
windows provides a simple uncluttered desktop for the user. It also
provides for easy navigation among windows, allowing switching
between windows with a minimum of key strokes or mouse clicks.

      The basic scheme assumes that the user does not size or
move any of the application windows. The application opens when the
user
"double clicks" on the object representing the application in the
main
work area or display screen.  In OS/2* 2.X, this is called the
Workplace Shell. The application work area which opens (Fig. 1) is a
window which is almost full screen with the top, bottom, and right
sides
of the window being positioned flush against the top, bottom, and
right sides of the screen. The left sizing border is inset from the
left side of the screen by a very small amount (e.g., 20 pels). This
leaves a very small sliver of the desktop visible to the user, so
that the pointing device can be used to access the operating system
window list (by "cording" in OS/2* 2.X) thus encouraging the use of
the
mouse rather than the keyboard commands.  "Cording" refers to
depressing
the left and right mouse buttons simultaneously.

      All primary windows that are opened from the application
work area are the same width as the application work area. The left,
right, and bottom sizing borders are positioned exactly on top of the
left, right, and bottom sizing borders of the application work area.
The
top sizing border is positioned flush against the bottom of the title
bar for the application work area. This provides an uncluttered
appearance, but allows the u...