Browse Prior Art Database

LAN NetView Common Management Information Protocol Tool

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112455D
Original Publication Date: 1994-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 105K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ali, M: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed are two programs for building and executing test cases involving the Common Management Information Protocol (CMIP). These programs make use of two new key technologies: a dynamic user interface for collecting request information and an engine for dynamically determining the semantics of a CMIP request.

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LAN NetView Common Management Information Protocol Tool

      Disclosed are two programs for building and executing test
cases involving the Common Management Information Protocol (CMIP).
These programs make use of two new key technologies:  a dynamic user
interface for collecting request information and an engine for
dynamically determining the semantics of a CMIP request.

      MOTIVATIONS - A tool was required to test the IBM LAN* NetView*
family of products.  This tool needed to be easily upgraded, yet deal
with the complexities of the CMIP management protocol.

      The ALIX and GOFORIT tools were developed in response to these
needs.  ALIX provides a command-line interface for defining and
executing test cases involving CMIP requests and replies.  GOFORIT is
a graphical user interface for ALIX.  The technologies disclosed are
implemented both in the original configuration of GOFORIT using ALIX
and in a new version of GOFORIT that imbedded the technology of ALIX
inside GOFORIT.

      Other tools exist for building CMIP requests using either a
pre-compiled, static database of request/reply structures or
hard-coded data structures.  These tools are less usable due to the
rapidly changing set of definitions used for requests (due to
standards changes and product development).

Known examples of such tools are:

o   Xxcal, Inc.'s CMIP test tool

o   Ralph Kirkley Associates, Inc.'s TOPO** test tool

o   IBM PALS test tools for the LAN NetView product family

      The methods disclosed are improvements over the existing tools
because they handle a database of dynamically-loaded request
structures.  Since the database can be changed dynamically,
recompilation of the test tool is not required to adapt to the new
request structures.  Likewise, the user interface supports this
database, presenting an up-to-date view of the request structures
being used.

KEY TECHNOLOGIES DYNAMIC CLASS DEFINITION HANDLING

      The IBM LAN NetView Manage* product, via its X/OPEN***
Management Protocol (XMP) interface implementation, provides a means
for loading "contents" packages which define the request structures
that will be supported for a particular application.  The application
can chose which of these packages to load via a call to the XMP API.
IBM's XMP implementation uses these contents packages to translate
the API call into a CMIP request and vice versa.  Unlike other
implementations of XMP and CMIP test tools, IBM's implementation
includes a large set of these packages.  It also allows for
applications to define their own packages to extend what IBM
provides.

      ALIX uses this technology to provide the human user with the
same range of request possibilities that any application using IBM
LAN NetView Manage have available.  ALIX reads the conte...