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Browse Prior Art Database

Multi-Size Chip Alignment Fixture

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112457D
Original Publication Date: 1994-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 62K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Edmundson, RJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A means was required to align different sizes and shapes of Devices Under Test (DUTs) whose exact X-Y orientation is not known when they are loaded by a robot into a workstation from one of several types of carriers. An additional requirement was that the mechanism must not subject DUTs to potentially damaging physical forces during alignment. The chip alignment fixture satisfied these requirements.

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Multi-Size Chip Alignment Fixture

      A means was required to align different sizes and shapes of
Devices Under Test (DUTs) whose exact X-Y orientation is not known
when they are loaded by a robot into a workstation from one of
several types of carriers.  An additional requirement was that  the
mechanism must not subject DUTs to potentially damaging physical
forces during alignment.  The chip alignment fixture satisfied these
requirements.

      Disclosed is a fixture used to provide precise alignment in a
workstation of DUTs of different sizes and shapes.  All kinds of
devices can be aligned with this fixture, provided that their bottom
surfaces must be smooth and even enough to seal vacuum apertures in
the fixture for seating of the DUT during alignment.  A range of
sizes and shapes (square or rectangular) can be accommodated without
operator intervention, and the movement of fixture components is
carefully controlled to prevent damage to DUTs.

      As shown in the Figure, the fixture consists of an alignment
base 1, on which are mounted a slide orienter 2, X axis stop 3 and Y
axis stop 4, an air cylinder 5, flow controls 6, and a vacuum sensor
switch 7.  Air pressure 9 applied to the air cylinder 5 and vacuum 10
applied to orifices in the slide orienter 2, are supplied by the host
workstation under control of the host controller.

      When a DUT is initially loaded, it is placed at an offset from
the axis stops to allow for initial skew.  Th...