Browse Prior Art Database

Wire Support Structure on Flexure

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112485D
Original Publication Date: 1994-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Albrecht, DW: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a Suspension Assembly used in Hard Disk Drives to improve head wire routing. Usually the shape of head wire loop extending from Magneto-Resistive (MR) slider to Suspension Assembly is vertical shown in figures because 4 pieces of the ultra sonic or soldering Pads are located horizontally. So, the maximum Head Suspension Assembly (HSA) height at the far end of HSA is defined by the head wire loop.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 76% of the total text.

Wire Support Structure on Flexure

      Disclosed is a Suspension Assembly used in Hard Disk Drives to
improve head wire routing.  Usually the shape of head wire loop
extending from Magneto-Resistive (MR) slider to Suspension Assembly
is vertical shown in figures because 4 pieces of the ultra sonic or
soldering Pads are located horizontally.  So, the maximum Head
Suspension Assembly (HSA) height at the far end of HSA is defined by
the head wire loop.

      If we try to use an MR slider on a Suspension Assembly with a
Dynamic Load/Unload feature, we can not use vertical head wire loop
shape because these wires might touch the Dynamic Load/Unload
feature.  So, we need to make the head wire loop shape horizontally
instead of vertically.  But, it is still difficult to control the 4
wires not to touch the Dynamic Load/Unload feature.

      In order to solve this problem, we designed two kinds of new
Flexures shown in Figs. 1 and 2.  One of them has a Wire Limiter at
the far end of the Flexure shown in Fig. 1.  Even if the wires were
already damaged before assembling, the Wire Limiter can prevent the
head wires from touching the Dynamic Load/Unload feature.

      Another one has 4 Fingers at the far end of the Flexure shown
in Fig. 2.  Even if the wires were already damaged at assembling, the
fingers can support them.  Then by pulling the damaged wires from
outside, they might be recovered.

      In both cases, we may use plastic material or over c...