Browse Prior Art Database

Wire Shuttle Matrix Impact Printer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112599D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 87K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Sundstrom, PH: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is an impact matrix printer mechanism which reverses an existing shuttle printer principle by shuttling a print-wire guide of several in-line print wires each driven by a fixed hammer. The design permits simplification of high-speed high-resolution printing of current matrix printers by making stationary the hammer units, but shuttling a low-mass wire guide instead. The massive counter weighting of shuttled hammer unit printers, needed to balance out generated vibrations, and their assocciated high power requirements are greatly minimised in this new mechanism. Lighter weight simple parts with lower power allows greater reliability, lower manufacturing costs, improved output dot density with flexible control of dot contrast.

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Wire Shuttle Matrix Impact Printer

      Disclosed is an impact matrix printer mechanism which reverses
an existing shuttle printer principle by shuttling a print-wire guide
of several in-line print wires each driven by a fixed hammer.  The
design permits simplification of high-speed high-resolution printing
of current matrix printers by making stationary the hammer units, but
shuttling a low-mass wire guide instead.  The massive counter
weighting of shuttled hammer unit printers, needed to balance out
generated vibrations, and their assocciated high power requirements
are greatly minimised in this new mechanism.  Lighter weight simple
parts with lower power allows greater reliability, lower
manufacturing costs, improved output dot density with flexible
control of dot contrast.

      In reference to Fig. 1, in a matrix printer, to increase print
quality, the print density must be increased equal to the number of
dots (4) per distance (DPI) (Dots/Inch) (2).  In band (5) matrix
printer technology the limitation is approximately 150 DPI along a
print line of 13.2 inches (335.3 mm) assuming that all dots are
printed on paper while the band (5) has moved one dot pitch (2).  To
increase matrix definition the number of hammers (1) must be
drastically increased with consequent miniaturization, packaging and
drive current problems.  The reason for the drastic increase in
hammers is due to the nipping protection distance (3) between each
hammer and to the next print dot (4).  This distance of approx 1 mm
is constant and hinders any decrease in dot distance (nipping
protection 3 is equal to the band (5) speed x hammer (1) fire time).

      In reference to Fig. 2, the solution to the nipping problem has
been to dedicate one hammer (1a) to one print point (4) and gang
together several hammers (1a, b, c) fixed into a shuttle/hammer unit
and the print points (4) are shuttled back and forth (6) over a
limited distance to address all dots in front of all possible dot
positions on the paper.  A disadvantage of shuttle technology is that
a h...