Browse Prior Art Database

Personal Communicator Configurations

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112733D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 6 page(s) / 239K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Alverez, CA: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

Disclosed are a number of configurations for small devices combining computer and communications functions. While large-scale integration of electronic chips and advanced packaging techniques may allow the containment of a number of functions within the form of a typical portable phone, a number of modifications to this form are required to allow the more sophisticated input and output devices required for computer functions to be included in an erogonomically acceptable manner.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 39% of the total text.

Personal Communicator Configurations

      Disclosed are a number of configurations for small devices
combining computer and communications functions.  While large-scale
integration of electronic chips and advanced packaging techniques may
allow the containment of a number of functions within the form of a
typical portable phone, a number of modifications to this form are
required to allow the more sophisticated input and output devices
required for computer functions to be included in an erogonomically
acceptable manner.

      Figs. 1a and 1b are both plan views of portable handset 10
having a touch-sensitive Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) screen 12 on
its upper surface.  Portable telephone elements include a speaker
slot pattern 14, behind which a speaker is mounted, a microphone slot
pattern 16, behind which a microphone is mounted, and an antenna 18.
Fig. 1a shows the device in a telephone call-up mode, in which
telephone numbers can be entered by pressing the touch-sensitive
screen at the key icons 20 displayed by means of the LCD.  Each
keystroke may be verified by an acoustic signal, as the number itself
is written for visual verification in a display area 22 above the key
icons.  Fig. 1b shows the device in a computer/organizer mode, in
which a number of program selection icons 24 are displayed on screen
12.  The device may be switched between typical organizer functions,
such as address/phone, memo, calculator, and fax, by touching an
associated icon 24.  A card 26, built in accordance with PCMCIA
standards, may be inserted to engage a connector (not shown),
providing optional memory, communications, and application program
extensions.  An RJ-11 connector (not shown) provides access to the
standard wired telephone network.

      Figs. 2a through 2c show a somewhat more compact handset 30.
Fig. 2a is a plan view of the device in a telephone call-up mode,
while Fig. 2b is a plan view of the device in a computer/organizer
mode.  These modes operate as described above.  Fig. 2c is a right
elevational view of the device.  To form a compact device, the
microphone section 32 is mounted to pivot at a hinge 34 between an
open position and a closed position, indicated in Fig. 2c by dashed
lines 36.  While the telephone-type keypad is still displayed as a
pattern of icons 38 on a touch-sensitive screen 40, application
selection keys 42 are mounted within microphone section 32.  In the
computer/organizer mode, screen 40 may display, for example, a number
of program feature icons 44, along with alphanumeric data.  Handset
30 also includes a speaker behind a slot pattern 46, an antenna 48, a
slot for receiving a PCMCIA-type card 50, and an RJ11 connector 52.

      Figs. 3a and 3b show a handset 54 having a full alphanumeric
keyboard 55 on an upper surface 56.  An LCD screen 58 is attached to
a lower surface 60 of a hinged section 62.  When the device is used
as a telephone, this hinged section 62 is left closed, as...