Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Text Editing Productivity Improvement by Element Isolation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112800D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 4 page(s) / 151K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Holden, IG: AUTHOR

Abstract

Described is a method to reduce programming overhead associated with certain kinds of editing operations by allowing the user to edit elements of text in isolation to surrounding text. Modifications are made to the Text Editor to permit Element Isolation.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 35% of the total text.

Text Editing Productivity Improvement by Element Isolation

      Described is a method to reduce programming overhead associated
with certain kinds of editing operations by allowing the user to edit
elements of text in isolation to surrounding text.  Modifications are
made to the Text Editor to permit Element Isolation.

      This invention has been used in the tool WINCMT which is a set
of XEDIT macros providing element isolation editing facilities for
paragraphs of text, program source, remarks and comments (including
"abstract" comments).  Element Isolation is particularly applicable
to Windowing Systems, as the element can be isolated by containing it
in a window.  It is also beneficial to text editors using 3270 style
alphanumeric fields, because the hard boundaries of fields (often
dividing an element) can be avoided by isolating the element into a
field (or fields) customized to the editing requirements of the
element.  The most user friendly application of Element Isolation
could be in an editor like IBM's VM/CMS Live Parsing Editor (LEXX)
which currently highlights different types of element.  Running on a
powerful intelligent workstation, a Live Parsing Editor could be
extended to provide dynamic element re-formatting as changes are
made.  In such a system, the physical isolation of the element from
its surrounding text for editing would not be necessary.  The
isolation would be provided by dynamically maintaining the correct
format of the text elements - according to the information in the
Element Definition List - as the user makes the changes.

      A typical text (or program source) editor presents the user
with a view of a file formatted into lines of text.  Text can be
inserted, deleted or changed in a predictable way based on concepts
such as character, word, phrase, line, paragraph and box.  These
concepts are not always suitable for the text being edited.  Consider
a single line of a 'C' source program.

     rc = DoSomething(param1, param2); /* Do something       @L1A*/

      Most text editors will treat this as a single line of text, but
in fact, it is at least three independent, but related text elements:
Source, Remark and Change-flag.  Using a normal text editor to change
the 'Source' part of the line would have side effects on the other
elements on the same line which may need to be anticipated and/or
corrected by the user.  In extreme cases, a simple change to insert a
single character into a line of text may require a considerable
amount of unnecessary editing.  This is especially so on 'dumb'
terminals where editing capability is more limited.  To achieve the
simple character insert may involve splitting the line into two,
inserting the character, then re-formatting the text to achieve the
desired result.  The extra effort needed to simply update a program
comment deters programmers from keeping comments up to date with code
changes.  There are other text elements that a...