Browse Prior Art Database

Super Z-Theta Gaging Tool

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112810D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 6 page(s) / 123K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Mueller, W: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Described is a hardware implementation to enhance the use of a gaging device, as used in the fabrication of magnetic recording disks, through the use of a super Z-Theta gaging tool in order to achieve total tool accuracy of less than five microns.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Super Z-Theta Gaging Tool

      Described is a hardware implementation to enhance the use of a
gaging device, as used in the fabrication of magnetic recording
disks, through the use of a super Z-Theta gaging tool in order to
achieve total tool accuracy of less than five microns.

      The super Z-Theta gaging tool is used to adjust gripper fingers
off-line for Hard Disk Assembly (HDA) operations to be able to attain
a total tool accuracy of less than five microns.  Fig. 1 shows gaging
tool 10 mounted onto table top 11.  Tool 10 is isolated from table
top 11 by means of four cushion pads 12.  Two corner brackets 13 are
attached to table top 11 and are utilized to secure gaging tool 10.

      Fig. 2 shows a side view of gaging tool 10, Fig. 3 shows
section A-A of gaging tool 10, Fig. 4 shows section B-B of Fig. 3,
Fig. 5 shows section C-C of Fig. 3 and Fig. 6 shows section D-D of
Fig. 3.

      In actual operation, gripper 14 (Fig. 2) is attached to
rotating axis 15 (Fig. 4).  The operator places disk 16 (Fig. 2) onto
the bottom rotating table 17 (Fig. 2).  Computer 18 (Fig. 1) controls
and opens gripper fingers 19 (Fig. 2 and 3), then moves down to pick
up disk 16 (Fig. 2) and moves back up afterwards.  Gripper 14 moves
back down again pushing against spring loaded center lifter 20 (Fig.
3).  The Z-axis stops when disk 16 (Fig. 2) touches the bottom
rotating axis surface.  Gripper fingers 19 (Fig. 2) open and place
disk 16 on the surface then moves back up.

      Gaging sensor assembly 21 (Fig. 3), which has X-Y-Z micrometer
adjustments, is first manually advanced to within two millimeters of
disk 16.  Then the operator uses the micrometer adjustment to advance
the sensor to within 0.2 mm...