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Near-Contact Recording with an Integrated Air-Bearing Slider/Suspension Structure or Alternatively an Air-Bearing Chiplet Attached to a Microsuspension

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112818D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 94K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Alexopoulos, PS: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Requirements on storage areal densities continue to increase. To accomplish these increases, the separation between the magnetic head and disk has to decrease substantially, placing the magnetic head in very close proximity to the moving disk surface. Current slider/suspension technology has to be substantially improved to achieve reliable submicro-inch slider flying heights.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

Near-Contact Recording with an Integrated Air-Bearing Slider/Suspension
Structure or Alternatively an Air-Bearing Chiplet Attached to a Microsuspension

      Requirements on storage areal densities continue to increase.
To accomplish these increases, the separation between the magnetic
head and disk has to decrease substantially, placing the magnetic
head in very close proximity to the moving disk surface.  Current
slider/suspension technology has to be substantially improved to
achieve reliable submicro-inch slider flying heights.

      This invention proposes using an integrated
head/slider/microsuspension structure or, alternatively, a very small
slider chiplet attached to a microsuspension, which helps to minimize
wear and reliability problems in near-contact recording.  To achieve
this, a small size, low-mass slider needs to be fabricated as an
integral part of a low-load suspension or can be attached as a
separate component to a microsuspension.

      Miniature sliders with air-bearing surfaces can be designed to
fly at very low flying heights (25nm or less) with very low
suspension loads (less than 250 mgf).  These integrated assemblies
are similar to the flex beam, vertical recording approach with
controlled wear, but here contains (instead of the contact pad) a
small, low-mass, air-bearing slider to provide a long-term reliable
interface between the slider and disk.  In addition, this approach
provides self-alignment between the slider or magnetic head and the
disk, unlike the contact recording approach where initial wear-in of
the head is needed to get the magnetic head pole-tips into contact
with the disk because of contact pad misalignment due to assembly and
component flatness tolerances.

      The simplest embodiment of the proposed structure would then be
a miniature slider chiplet attached to a flex beam microsuspension.
The flex beam could be a simple rectangular thin beam, or a
lengthwise tapered beam, easily created via a photolithographic
deposition process with tightly controlled thickness tolerances.  To
achieve more desirable suspension dynamics, a more complicated planar
suspension structure could be fabricated, with a specially tailored
integrated gimbal design, to provide desirable gimbal pitch and roll
stiffnesses to minimize fly height tolerances and provide good slider
compliance with the disk (e.g., see suspension design in [*]).
Integrated wiring can also easily be incorporated in the flex beam,
and a suitable attach process can be used to attach the slider.

      A s...