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Multi-Head Optical Router/Drill Machine

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112837D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Haskell, R: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The system described is designed to be an enhancement to currently available printed circuit board routing and drilling machines. However, it is not limited to that application and can be designed to retrofit routing or drilling machines where increased precision alignment of the work piece to the cutting tool is desired along with the increased capacity available from multiple head drilling or routing machines.

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Multi-Head Optical Router/Drill Machine

      The system described is designed to be an enhancement to
currently available printed circuit board routing and drilling
machines.  However, it is not limited to that application and can be
designed to retrofit routing or drilling machines where increased
precision alignment of the work piece to the cutting tool is desired
along with the increased capacity available from multiple head
drilling or routing machines.

      The concept consists of several components.  The base machine
is a multi-station router or drilling machine consisting of a
plurality of spindles mounted over individual work stations in
conjunction with a X-Y positioning system that moves all stations
simultaneously in relation to the spindles.  This arrangement is
common in most circuit board routing and drilling equipment.  A
camera system is mounted along side each spindle and each workstation
is outfitted with an individual X-Y-Theta positioning system that is
mounted on top of the main X-Y positioning system (Figure).

      The system operates by using the vision system to locate a
number of fiducials or reference marks on the work piece loaded into
each station.  Positioning information is then fed back through the
controller to allow the individual X-Y Theta tables to position each
work piece precisely in reference to each spindle.  The work station
positioning systems are then clamped in place automatically.  At this
point the main po...